Understanding climate
for the benefit of society

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Climate scientist Eystein Jansen has been elected vice-president of the European Research Council (ERC). He is the first Norwegian researcher to join the leadership of the elite division for European research.

Predicting future fisheries is possible only if the present conditions are known. An international team of scientists works to reduce the South Atlantic's lag behind the North.

Climate models produce enormous amounts of data. These are too large to handle for ordinary people, and too costly to run on large super computers. A new cooperation on machine learning and AI looks to solve the problem.

For the first time, the impact of global warming on the Atlantic Niño has been addressed.  The result, published in Nature Climate Change, shows a strong weakening of the sea surface temperature variability. This implies less variations in sea surface temperatures in the future and will affect weather and fisheries along the coast lines on both sides of the South Atlantic Ocean.

New data by ICOS confirms that natural carbon sinks such as the ocean and forests are not stable. Climate change makes these sinks more vulnerable, in some cases even turning them into carbon emitters. This compromises current climate targets and action plans.

Natives of Greenland and the Pacific lead different lives, but have one thing in common. Both communities are strongly affected by climate change.  

When a fishing vessel sets course for Bear Island, the captain knows only which areas are ice-covered now, not where the ice will be tomorrow. In a few years, sea ice predictions will make routing easier and safer.

The oxygen level in the global ocean has declined, limiting the living space of fish. New research is aimed at improving future oxygen projections.

The Research Council of Norway funds eight new project on Chinese-Norwegian climate research in the Arctic. Five of these, awarded a total of NOK 50 million, are led by researchers affiliated by the Bjerknes Centre. Forskningsrådet deler ut åtti millioner til norsk-kinesisk samarbeid om klimaforskning i Arktis. Femti av disse går til Bjerknessenterets forskere.

With equipment normally found in hospitals, geologists can analyze material quicker. Jan Magne Cederstrøm writes about the use of CT scans in a study of debris transported by glaciers.