The Bjerknes Centre is a collaboration on climate research, between the University of Bergen, NORCE, the Institute of Marine Research, Nansen Environmental and Remote Sensing Centre.

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Almost one-fifth of the world’s population depends on rivers coming from the Himalayas and the Tibetan Plateau. Yet, only one in a thousand glaciers and lakes in this region have monitoring stations and constraints on the hydrological cycle are poor, Hans Christian Steen-Larsen and colleagues writes in a comment in Nature. 

Climate-Ocean research and tipping points are common denominators in three new EU funded research projects at the Bjerknes Centre. The project coordinators Christoph Heinze, Noel Keenlyside and Svein Østerhus together with Petra Langebroek received a nice pre-Christmas present, as EU have invited three new projects for funding negotiations. 

Vannet som strømmer inn i Barentshavet og Polhavet er blitt varmere det siste hundreåret. Fra år til år er det likevel strømmens styrke som regulerer hvor mye varme sjøisen utsettes for.  

“I’m looking forward to going back into the field”, says PhD student Sonja Wahl, who recently returned from her first fieldwork on Greenland.

Do we have the right tools to reach the targets agreed upon in Paris? Do climate models deliver what we need to tackle climate change? These questions were on the agenda for Norwegian climate modelers last week. 

By taking up CO2, the oceans slow down the pace of climate change. But this invaluable service of the oceans comes at a cost. Are Olsen, Nadine Goris, Siv Kari Lauvset and Ingunn Skjelvan are revisiting the problem of ocean acidification in a new Foresight Brief published by the UN Environment. 

Lea Svendsen was at first surprised to see how the Pacific impacted winter temperatures in the Arctic. Now, her results have been published in Nature Climate Change, while the Pacific transitions into a warm phase again. 

What climate research does governments need, and what can scientists offer? ICOS Norway and the Norwegian Environment Agency discussed the issues in a June seminar.

Will European winters be increasingly mild and wet in the coming years? Will climatic conditions be beneficial for Norwegian fisheries and hydroelectric power production? Such questions of large societal importance are at the heart of the emerging scientific field of climate prediction.

On TV weather maps we see low pressure centers as circles resembling tree-rings, with long tails of red warm fronts and blue cold fronts. But what came first – the low or the fronts?