The Bjerknes Centre is a collaboration on climate research, between the University of Bergen, NORCE, the Institute of Marine Research, Nansen Environmental and Remote Sensing Centre.

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During their agricultural season, the farmers of Mali highly rely on timely rainfall. A new collaboration project adapts the weather service yr.no for the rainy season in Mali.  

The Gulfstream makes northern Europe warmer by transporting heat. This is well known. New research shows that the sea surface temperature also affects storm tracks as far away as the Pacific.

An international research project has determined the amount of man-made CO2 emissions taken up by the ocean from the atmosphere between 1994 and 2007.

A new study provides evidence of substantial variations in past sea ice cover in the Norwegian Sea, instrumental for several abrupt climate changes between 32,000 and 40,000 years ago. 

Henrik Sadatzki defends on Friday 15.02.2019 his thesis for the PhD degree at the University of Bergen. The thesis is entitled: “Sea ice variability in the Nordic Seas over Dansgaard–Oeschger climate cycles during the last glacial – A biomarker approach”.  

Almost one-fifth of the world’s population depends on rivers coming from the Himalayas and the Tibetan Plateau. Yet, only one in a thousand glaciers and lakes in this region have monitoring stations and constraints on the hydrological cycle are poor, Hans Christian Steen-Larsen and colleagues writes in a comment in Nature. 

Climate-Ocean research and tipping points are common denominators in three new EU funded research projects at the Bjerknes Centre. The project coordinators Christoph Heinze, Noel Keenlyside and Svein Østerhus together with Petra Langebroek received a nice pre-Christmas present, as EU have invited three new projects for funding negotiations. 

Vannet som strømmer inn i Barentshavet og Polhavet er blitt varmere det siste hundreåret. Fra år til år er det likevel strømmens styrke som regulerer hvor mye varme sjøisen utsettes for.  

“I’m looking forward to going back into the field”, says PhD student Sonja Wahl, who recently returned from her first fieldwork on Greenland.