The Bjerknes Centre is a collaboration on climate research, between the University of Bergen, Norce, the Institute of Marine Research, Nansen Environmental and Remote Sensing Centre.

Summer clouds over the valley Oldedalen, Nordfjord. Photo: Atle Nesje  

ERC Consolidator Grant for Harald Sodemann

"Together with recent technological advances in isotope measurements and in-situ sample collection, this will allow us to acquire a new kind of observational data set that will follow the history of water vapour from source to sink", Harald Sodemann writes in the project abstract. 

Harald Sodemann portrettHarald Sodemann, Professor at the Geophysical Insitute and the Bjerknes Centre, is granted the ERC Consolidator Grant for the project "Isotopic links to atmospheric water's sources". 

The project abstracts: 

The hydrological cycle, with its feedbacks related to water vapour and clouds, is the largest source of uncertainty in weather prediction and climate models. Particularly processes that occur on scales smaller than the model grid lead to

errors, which can compensate one another, making them difficult to detect and correct for. Undetectable compensating errors critically limit the understanding of hydrological extremes, the response of the water cycle to a changing climate, and the interpretation of paleoclimate records. Stable water isotopes have a unique potential to serve as the needed constraints, as they provide measures of moisture origin and of the phase change history. We have recently spearheaded a revised view of the atmospheric water cycle, which highlights the importance of connections on a regional scale. This implies that in some areas, all relevant processes can be studied on a regional scale. The Nordic Seas are an ideal case of such a natural laboratory, with distinct evaporation events, shallow transport processes, and swift precipitation formation.

 

Together with recent technological advances in isotope measurements and in-situ sample collection, this will allow us to acquire a new kind of observational data set that will follow the history of water vapour from source to sink. The highresolution, high-precision isotope data will provide a combined view of established and novel natural isotopic source tracers and set new benchmarks for climate models. A unique palette of sophisticated model tools will allow us to decipher, synthesize and exploit these observations, and to identify compensating errors between water cycle processes in models.

 

In ISLAS, my team and I will thus make unprecedented use of stable isotopes to provide the sought-after constraints for an

improved understanding of the hydrological cycle in nature and in climate models, leading towards improved predictions of

future climate.


 

This year, three researchers at the UiB received the Consolidator Grants by the European Research Council, together with the grants goes to Jill Walker Rettberg, Professor of Digital Culture and Thomas Arnesen, Professor at the Department of Molecular Biology. 

 

At the Bjerknes Centre Sodemann joins a list of six projects awarded grants by the ERC:

  • 2014 Ice2ice, Eystein Jansen og Kerim Nisancioglu, ERC Synergy Grant
  • 2014 Nele Meckler, ERC Starting Grant
  • 2015 Noel Keenlyside, ERC Consolidator Grant
  • 2017 John Birks, ERC Advanced Grant
  • 2017 Hans Christian Steen-Larsen, ERC Starting Grant
  • 2017 Harald Sodemann, ERC Consolidator Grant